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Observation Date (UT) Observation Lat

Canonical Name:PSR B1259-63
TeVCat Name:TeV J1302-638
Other Names:LS 2883, HESS J1302-638
Source Type:Binary
R.A.:13 02 49.3 (hh mm ss)
Dec.:-63 49 53 (dd mm ss)
Gal Long: 304.19 (deg)
Gal Lat: -0.99 (deg)
Distance: 1.5 kpc
Flux:0.07 (Crab Units)
Energy Threshold:380 GeV
Spectral Index:2.81
Extended:No
Discovery Date:2005-10
Discovered By: H.E.S.S.
TeVCat SubCat:Default Catalog

Source Notes:

Source position and its uncertainty:
From Abramowski et al. (2013):
The test region was centred at:
R.A. (J2000): 13 02 48
Dec. (J2000): -63 50 09
No information on positional uncertainty.
From Aharonian et al. (2009):
- R.A. (J2000): 13 02 41 +/- 6s(stat)
- Dec. (J2000): -63 49 01 +/- 41"(stat)
From Aharonian et al. (2005):
- R.A. (J2000): 13 02 49.3 +/- 2.3s(stat)
- Dec. (J2000): -63 49 53 +/- 17"(stat)
- systematic error on pointing is 20"

Source Notes:
From The Fermi-LAT Collaborations (2017):
- "... we have detected a flare in >100 MeV gamma rays from
PSR B1259-63 over the time interval 2017-11-13 07:12:26 UTC to
2017-11-14 07:36:40 UTC with a significance of approximately 9
sigma. Our likelihood analysis yields a preliminary photon flux (from
100 MeV to 300 GeV) of (2.5 +/- 0.4) x 10^-6 ph/cm^2/s, and a
power-law photon index of 2.7 +/- 0.2, quoted uncertainties throughout
are statistical only."
"In the four days leading up to this most-recent flare, only the
previous day yields a significant detection of approximately 3 sigma
with a flux of (0.8 +/- 0.3) x 10^-6 ph/cm^2/s. The 95%
confidence-level flux upper limits for the three days prior to that
detection are 0.7, 0.6, and 1.0 x 10^-6 ph/cm^2/s, respectively."
"Similar to the recent flare reported in ATels #10924 and #10925,
dividing the time interval into 6-hour bins reveals that the emission
was concentrated in just one out the four 6-hour intervals, from
2017-11-13 13:12:26 to 19:12:26 UTC. The peak flux in this 6-hour bin
is (6.9 +/- 1.2) x 10^-6 ph/cm^2/s, assuming the same photon
index. The other three intervals had 95% confidence-level upper limits
of 2.1, 1.6, and 2.1 x 10^-6 ph/cm^2/s. At a distance of 2.3 kpc, the
peak 6-hour flare corresponds to a gamma-ray luminosity of (1.8 +/-
0.3) x 10^36 erg/s, about twice the spin-down power of the pulsar (8.3
x 10^35 erg/s). This implies that the emission can not be solely
powered by the rotation of the pulsar and/or significant beaming is
required."

Spectral Properties:
From Abramowski et al. (2013):
- 2010 Data - Spectral index: 2.92 +/- 0.30(stat) +/- 0.20(sys)
- 2004 Data - Spectral index: 2.81 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.20(sys)
From Aharonian et al. (2009):
- 2007 Data - Spectral index: 2.8 +/- 0.2(stat) +/- 0.2(syst)
From Aharonian et al. (2005):
- 2004 Data - Spectral index: 2.7 +/- 0.2(stat) +/- 0.2(sys)

Emission Characteristics:
From Sushch et al. (2013):
- "These new observations partially overlap with the beginning of a
spectacular gamma-ray flare reported by the Fermi-LAT (here too). The
H.E.S.S. observations show both flux and spectral properties similar
to those reported in previous periastron passages, without any
signature of the emission enhancement seen at GeV energies. A careful
statistical study based on the Fermi and H.E.S.S. lightcurves leads to
the conclusion that the GeV and TeV emission during the flare have a
different physical origin."


Seen by: H.E.S.S.
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